The History

 

Custom Built for A Man
Who Built San Francisco

Soon after the 1906 earthquake, Mortimer Fleishhacker, a highly successful San Francisco businessman, decided he wanted to build his family a summer home in the country and began buying property, eventually totaling seventy-four acres, in the heart of Woodside.

Mortimer Fleishhacker, whose investments included a power company, a paper box company and a chemical company, and who eventually became one of the nation’s leading bankers, hired architect Charles Sumner Greene. Mr. Greene, with his brother, Henry Mather Greene, among the most acclaimed architects of the Arts and Crafts movement, to design his estate.

A Discreet Destination
for The World’s Elite

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The guest list for Green Gables’ countless events has included world leaders and dignitaries spanning over a century of history. The United Nations celebrated its 20th birthday at Green Gables in 1965 with Secretary General U-Thant and the full array of ambassadors of the world’s nations.

Other distinguished visitors have included:

• Presidents past & future
• Crown Prince and Princess of Sweden
• Prince of Netherlands
• Speaker of the House of Representatives
• Countless Governors, Senators, Congressmen

 

Click to view the Green Gables National
Historic Registry (.pdf)

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Titans of Architecture: Charles and Henry Greene

In the pantheon of world architecture, the brothers Charles and Henry Greene are considered two of the greats. According to Smithsonian Magazine, it was the unique style of the Greene brothers that raised the Arts and Crafts movement of the early 20th century to its consummate American expression..


Elsie de Wolfe: The First Lady of Interior Design

Born in 1865, design legend Elsie de Wolfe devoted her life to making everything around her beautiful.  A maverick in the male-dominated field, she became known as the first lady of interior decoration.  For de Wolfe, the focus was not on what would fit in a room, but what was appropriate to a room. 

She took great offense to “ugly” decorating, and pioneered an anti-Victorian style of simplicity and airiness.  Her talent attracted the attention of famed architect Stanford White, who championed her commission to design the interior of the Colony Club, New York’s first social club for women...

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